231 Front Street, Lahaina, HI 96761 info@givingpress.com 808.123.4567

Tag: America

America could really, truly get infrastructure improvements soon

Remember all the hope and hype during the last presidential election about how the United States would soon spend a lot of money on infrastructure no matter who won? Four years later, we’re still waiting for Washington to take action.



a close up of a factory: A contract crew for Verizon, works on a cell tower to update it to handle the new 5G network in Orem, Utah on December 10, 2019. - The new 5G cellular network will substantially increase cellular network speeds, opening up new markets for business and individuals. (Photo by GEORGE FREY / AFP) (Photo by GEORGE FREY/AFP via Getty Images)


© George Frey/AFP/Getty Images
A contract crew for Verizon, works on a cell tower to update it to handle the new 5G network in Orem, Utah on December 10, 2019. – The new 5G cellular network will substantially increase cellular network speeds, opening up new markets for business and individuals. (Photo by GEORGE FREY / AFP) (Photo by GEORGE FREY/AFP via Getty Images)

But with many investors now betting that Joe Biden will defeat Trump — and some experts even pricing in the possibility of a blue wave that gives Democrats control of the Senate — a big infrastructure deal could have a better chance of getting done sometime next

Read More

Australian writer reveals the strange culture shocks she faced while living in America

An Australian writer who has spent months living in the United States has shared the noticeable differences between the two countries, including how you pay for petrol, use public bathrooms and buy alcohol.

Madolline Gourley, 30, from Brisbane, Queensland, runs an online blog called One Cat At A Time, and prior to the coronavirus lockdown, spent more than two years cat sitting for families in the States.

During those lengthy stays she became acutely aware of the way Americans live their day-to-day lives and how it differs from the Australian lifestyle, from road rules to adding tax to every purchase you make.

So what are the main variances? 

Madolline Gourley runs an online blog called One Cat At A Time , and prior to the coronavirus lockdown, spent more than two years cat sitting for families in the States

1. Pay for petrol before filling up 

In Madolline’s experience Australians

Read More

Housing shortage fuels rising cost of homes in America

Back in 1971 when “All in the Family” debuted on CBS, no one questioned how a dock worker named Archie Bunker could afford a home on a charming block in Queens, New York. Back then, Archie’s home was worth about $35,000. 

Today, it is valued at more than $800,000. Even after correcting for inflation, that’s more than triple what Archie would have paid for it. 

And sure enough, when “CBS This Morning” visited last winter, there were not many Archie Bunkers buying into the neighborhood. You’re more likely to find doctors, nurses and engineers.

Not even COVID-19 could change that. The pandemic has inspired many buyers to look for larger, more comfortable homes. 

The median price of a townhouse, home or condo soared above $300,000 for the first time over the summer. The average property is selling in just 22 days, faster than ever. 

That new demand has run into

Read More

Why Home Improvement Has Surged And How It’s Changing America

The sound of power tools is roaring in neighborhoods across the United States.

In the Brookside neighborhood in central Kansas City, Mo., John Buhr has do-it-yourself projects going from top of the garage to the basement.

“As soon as COVID hit, we needed someplace the kids could play,” Buhr says, noting that neighborhood parks were closed. “So we put a playhouse down [in the basement] first and then found the kids liked it so much that we went ahead and built a living room. And then my wife needed the space to work.”

So now Buhr is building an office for his wife in what was an unfinished attic above the garage. He’s also working on a self-contained apartment for his parents and in-laws to use when they’re in town for extended babysitting visits.

“This all kind of became immediately necessary, thanks to COVID,” Buhr says.

Necessity is one factor

Read More

Why Home Improvement Has Surged And How It’s Changing America : NPR

“It used to be a backyard. Now it’s a summer oasis,” says Astoria Camille of the water feature she built in her mother’s Kansas City, Mo., backyard using an old stock tank and 53 bags of pea gravel.

Frank Morris/KCUR


hide caption

toggle caption

Frank Morris/KCUR

“It used to be a backyard. Now it’s a summer oasis,” says Astoria Camille of the water feature she built in her mother’s Kansas City, Mo., backyard using an old stock tank and 53 bags of pea gravel.

Frank Morris/KCUR

The sound of power tools is roaring in neighborhoods across the United States.

In the Brookside neighborhood in central Kansas City, Mo., John Buhr has do-it-yourself projects going from top of the garage to the basement.

“As soon as COVID hit, we needed someplace the kids could play,” Buhr says, noting that neighborhood parks were closed. “So we put a playhouse down [in the

Read More