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Tag: COVID19

Researchers design comprehensive toolkit to help Ohioans at higher COVID-19 risk

Those looking to improve the lives of Ohioans facing the greatest COVID-19 risks now have a comprehensive, evidence-based toolkit – one designed to inform the work of everyone from grassroots community groups to state leaders.

Ohio’s COVID-19 Populations Needs Assessment, released today (Oct. 13, 2020) and led by experts at The Ohio State University College of Public Health, aims to improve Ohioans’ ability to prevent transmission of the virus and minimize its impact on communities that are at elevated risk.

The new report, conducted in collaboration with the Ohio Department of Health, is built on information gathered from a survey of 363 Ohioans representing people of color, rural populations and individuals with disabilities.

The survey, subsequent analysis and recommendations focus on six populations: Black and African American; Latino and Hispanic; Asian and Asian American; immigrant and refugee; rural; and people with disabilities.

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Messenger: Parson orders investigation into COVID-19 outbreak in veterans homes. What about prisons? | Tony Messenger

The state prison in Farmington is undergoing at least its second major COVID-19 spike, with 300 detainees and 53 staff members infected. Since the pandemic began, there have been 481 detainees and 108 staffers infected at Farmington. Down the road, also in St. Francois County, the prison at Bonne Terre has 46 active detainee cases and nine staff members affected, bringing its total to 370 detainees infected since the pandemic began, and 103 staff members.

St. Francois County, just south of St. Louis, has one of the highest positivity rates in the state of Missouri, at 37 people per 1,000. It’s a chicken-and-egg question: Is the prison spike feeding the positivity rate, or is it because there is little mask wearing and social distancing in another rural county eschewing mandates and restrictions, continuing to believe that the more than 210,000 deaths nationwide are a hoax?

Missourians should not be surprised

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Young people return to their parents’ homes in the US due to COVID-19


6 min read

This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.


This story originally appeared on Alto Nivel

By Antonio Sandoval

For the first time in nine decades , young adults have returned to parental homes at a rate not seen since the Great Depression era of the 1930s , according to an analysis by the Pew Research Center with data from the United States Census Bureau.

The obvious cause was the loss of job or decrease in income that the pandemic brought with it. According to the source, at the end of July the total number of young adults who lived with one of their parents or with both grew to 26.6 million , which meant an increase of 2.6 million compared to February , just before the devastating impact of the pandemic in the world’s

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Should my LinkedIn photo be more casual because of covid-19?

Contractor’s Question: Some because of covid, some because their clientele has changed, IT contractors I know have made their LinkedIn photo more informal. They’ve not quite gone for ripped Guns N’ Roses T-shirts, but one contact who now displays the ‘#Open to Work’ feature on their LinkedIn profile has morphed from a suit and tie to the comfy pullover-and-coffee-mug-look. Should I go casual too?

Expert’s Answer: The LinkedIn photograph is an essential component of a contractor’s LinkedIn profile. It is statistically proven that those who have a positive photograph increase engagement and the number of opportunities that come their way.

Covid is causing many to ask…

So the question is, ‘What sort of photograph on LinkedIn should contractors opt for?’ And it’s a question that the coronavirus pandemic is forcing people to ask themselves again.

One LinkedIn user I half-know has decided that the perfectly-polished, power pose of

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Delhi stops displaying notices at homes of COVID-19 patients because of stigma

By Sanjeev Miglani

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Delhi authorities have stopped putting notices outside the homes of people infected with coronavirus because this has amplified the social stigma associated with the disease and in turn caused others to hide their illness, officials said on Monday.

Early on during the outbreak in the Indian capital, officials would paste a poster on the homes of people in quarantine after they had tested positive for the virus to make sure everyone in the neighbourhood was careful. It also deterred people from violating the quarantine.

But more than six months into the pandemic people were fully aware of COVID-19, the respiratory disease caused by the virus, and there was less need to publicise the cases, city officials said. Instead it was important to instil confidence in people to come forward and test themselves.

“There is a stigma with the coronavirus disease and posters outside

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Nevada Lifts Block on Rapid Covid-19 Tests in Nursing Homes

The state of Nevada withdrew a directive that blocked nursing homes from using federally provided rapid coronavirus testing equipment late on Friday, in response to an order from the Trump administration.

Nevada told nursing homes on Oct. 2 to stop using the rapid-testing equipment, citing concerns about false-positive results. The back and forth highlights a debate over the proper use of the tests after reports of some false positives.

In a letter to state officials, Adm. Brett Giroir, the Department of Health and Human Services official who has overseen U.S. testing efforts, said the state’s action to ban use of the tests was “inconsistent with and preempted by federal law and, as such, must cease immediately or appropriate action will be taken against those involved.” The letter was dated Oct. 8 and made public Friday.

Adm. Giroir defended the performance of the federally supplied equipment on a call Friday with

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Montana’s care homes struggle with staffing and ever-changing regulations as COVID-19 cases rise | State & Regional

During the first three months of the pandemic, Coe kept a bed in his office because he didn’t want to infect his family and wanted to reassure his staff he was there for them.

“Health care and our industry didn’t bring this to the state, but we’re living with choices everybody makes whether you gown up, mask up, you wash your hands — whatever happens, if it gets into the facility, we have to live with whatever happens,” Coe said.

‘Staff doesn’t grow on trees’

The Montana Health Care Association serves long-term care facilities in the state, and many have reached out to get answers and support, according to Rose Hughes, the association’s executive director.

“To me it has just brought forth a whole new experience and lots of questions about how should these things be handled,” Hughes said in an interview in September. “What can you do? Because staff

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18,000 elderly people have died of COVID-19 in British care homes and now Boris Johnson’s government is being accused of human rights abuse



a man and a woman standing in front of a mirror: Care worker Sarah Cox helps fix care home resident, Patricia Taylor's hair on May 6, 2020 in Borehamwood, England Getty


© Getty
Care worker Sarah Cox helps fix care home resident, Patricia Taylor’s hair on May 6, 2020 in Borehamwood, England Getty

  • The death of thousands of COVID-19 in British care homes was a violation of their human rights, according to Amnesty International.
  • The human rights organization has now called for the public inquiry, promised by the government in July, to begin immediately. 
  • The report also raised particular concerns about the inappropriate use of “do not attempt resuscitation” (DNAR) orders issued on a blanket basis in care homes.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

More than 18,000 untested elderly people died of COVID-19 in British care homes in what a damning new report from Amnesty International has described as a violation of their human rights.

Between March and June, over 28,116 “excess deaths” were recorded in care homes in England, with 18,500 of them confirmed to have been

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Gov. J.B. Pritzker warns Illinois’ improvements have ‘cooled down’ as 2,818 more people test positive for COVID-19

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Lake County flagged at COVID-19 warning level as 2,818 more test positive statewide

AP Photos

Illinois’ coronavirus testing positivity rate inched upward for a third consecutive day Friday as public health officials announced another hefty caseload of 2,818 more people testing positive for COVID-19.

They were diagnosed among 71,599 tests submitted, raising the statewide average positivity rate over the last week to 3.8%. That number indicates how rapidly the virus is spreading — and that’s as high as it’s been in almost a month.

Gov. J.B. Pritzker warned this week that the state’s improvement from a midsummer resurgence has “cooled down.”

And while over the last few months, the state’s COVID-19 problem areas have popped up well beyond the Chicago area — mostly in central Illinois and downstate — the Democratic governor’s health team singled out north suburban Lake County for being among 26 counties considered to be at

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Trump Administration Orders Nevada to Allow Rapid Covid-19 Tests in Nursing Homes

The Trump administration ordered the state of Nevada to withdraw a directive blocking nursing homes from using federally provided rapid coronavirus testing equipment, highlighting a debate over the proper use of the tests after reports of some false-positive results.

In a letter to Nevada officials, Adm. Brett Giroir, the Department of Health and Human Services official who has overseen U.S. testing efforts, said the state’s action is “inconsistent with and pre-empted by federal law and, as such, must cease immediately or appropriate action will be taken against those involved.” The letter was dated Oct. 8 and made public Friday.

Adm. Giroir defended the performance of the federally supplied equipment on a call Friday with reporters, saying the false-positive rate was low and the issue could be managed by using proper procedures to confirm results. The state’s action wasn’t justified, he said. Adm. Giroir declined to say what enforcement action the

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